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Premium Relationship between blood coagulability and sense of burden among caregivers of patients with dementia
Author(s)
Hirano Akemi,
Suzuki Yusuke,
Umegaki Hiroyuki,
Hayashi Toshio,
Ina Koichiro,
Onishi Joji,
Hasegawa Jun,
Kuzuya Masafumi
Publication year2019
Publication title
geriatrics and gerontology international
Resource typeJournals
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Australia
Aim This study aimed to examine the relationship between blood coagulability and sense of burden among caregivers of patients with senile dementia of the Alzheimer type. Methods A cross‐sectional study was carried out involving healthy older caregivers who lived with their patients with senile dementia of the Alzheimer type. We evaluated the Zarit Burden Interview score, levels of von Willebrand factor antigen, D‐dimer, thrombin–antithrombin III complex, tissue plasminogen activator/plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 complex, number of chronic diseases, body mass index and number of medications. A linear regression model was used to estimate adjusted associations. Results Thrombin–antithrombin III complex levels were higher in female caregivers than in male caregivers ( P = 0.07). Headaches were significantly more frequent in female caregivers than in male caregivers, as assessed by a visual analog scale ( P  < 0.01). The number of chronic diseases and body mass index were positively associated with levels of tissue plasminogen activator/plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 complex ( P  < 0.05). Similarly, the number of medications was positively associated with levels of D‐dimer ( P  < 0.05). However, the Zarit Burden Interview score was not associated with blood coagulability ( P  > 0.05). Conclusions The present study found that the number of chronic diseases and body mass index were associated with blood coagulability, and that female caregivers were more prone to headaches and higher blood coagulability than male caregivers. These findings highlight the essential nature of health management during caregiving. The impact of caregiver burden on blood coagulability is likely to differ depending on the long‐term or short‐term psychological stress associated with caregiving conditions. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2019; 19: 804–808 .
Subject(s)body mass index , dementia , disease , family caregivers , gerontology , headaches , medicine , plasminogen activator , psychiatry
Language(s)English
SCImago Journal Rank0.823
H-Index57
eISSN1447-0594
pISSN1444-1586
DOI10.1111/ggi.13721

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